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16 October 2016

Marsala Wine Chocolate Cake


I love Marsala wine and if I can do what I want, I would pour it all over the food that I am cooking - all the time. It goes very well with both savory dishes and desserts, and ahem, even in my pancakes. Being in Italy, it's very easy for me to get a bottle at the supermarket that I use for cooking. I have heard from some readers that it is not that easy to acquire in some places and if ever they do find it, they don't know which one to get. Marsala is a kind of fortified wine that has three levels of sweetness and different levels of quality. For cooking savory dishes, it's best to use secco (dry) or semisecco (semi-dry) while for desserts, dolce (sweet) is the best option. The levels of quality ranges from fine which is aged for a year to vergine stravecchio/riserva or virgin reserve which is aged for 10 years or more. Of course, for cooking, get the cheapest one which is fine or superiore and leave the older ones for drinking.


I have always wondered how a cake baked with Marsala wine would come out. I do see some recipes in the internet but I never got to have a real slice in front of me. Rather than wait for it to pop in a restaurant menu one day, I knew that I had to make my own which I finally did. Marsala goes well with chocolate and in this simple cake, the main ingredients I used to give flavors are the Marsala wine and dark chocolate. Upon tasting, you can identify both tastes in one bite. It's simple and (Mind if I say it?) delicious! The consistency of the cake is soft and spongy which is how I was hoping it would come out. Pouring the cake with the Marsala syrup makes the it moist and with the tempting aroma of the Marsala, it's almost impossible not to grab a knife to take a slice of it - a big one. I hope you enjoy this one like how we did at home. 

For the full recipe of this Marsala Wine Chocolate Cake, you can get it at She Knows. For more of the recipes I created for them, check out my Profile Page. Buon appetito!

More Recipes with Marsala: