30 October 2012

Fried Scamorza Cheese & Chive Sandwich (Scamorza in Carrozza) and The Town of Veroli


I love lunches and dinners but breakfasts have a special hold on me.  I sometimes skip it with just a cup of espresso to jerk me awake before hurrying to do the morning things.  I always forget that breakfast is more important than anything else.  When I do give myself time to sit down and nourish myself to start the day, I get a glass of spremuta (freshly squeezed orange juice), season permitting, a bomba con la crema (doughnut stuffed with cream) if I don't feel too guilty about what I am eating or a cornetto (croissant) if I want to lighten up and a cup of espresso. 


I see scamorza in carrozza closely related to the bomba con la crema even if one is savory and the other is sweet.  It usually invokes smiles with silent tsk-tsks from persons near me in bars when I order a bomba con la crema.  You know why?  Bomba con la crema is deep fried and filled with cream.  Just like these scamorza in carrozza that are fried and filled with cheese.  You cannot get away eating them frequently.  Cholesterol bombs.  Ssshhh.  I won't tell if you promise not to eat them too often.


I originally thought of this as the French savory pain perdu (literally translated to the lost bread or commonly known as French toast), thus, I didn't coat them with flour.  The difference between the French and the Italian version is the coating of flour before being dipped in the milk & egg mixture.  I later found out that this is actually quite common in Italy under the name mozzarella in carrozza (if stuffed with mozzarella) originating from the area of Naples.  Scamorza in carrozza is an offshoot of the fried mozzarella sandwich.  Scamorza affumicata is the smoked version that I used which I sprinkled with some finely chopped fresh chives. 


Completing the breakfast platter, I prepared some slices of prosciutto crudo and salame alongside a tomato salad with caper berries simply dressed with balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil.

Breakfast can't be better!


Veroli is a town belonging to the region of Lazio and is about 100 kilometers from Rome.  It is close enough to spend the day away from the city.  Arriving to the old town, my first impression was how quiet and well-maintained the town is.  From the old cobblestone roads to the old houses, churches and big squares, everything gave a wonderful medieval feel while walking along the narrow streets.  Historically, it is believed to be already present on 12th century B.C.

Let me leave you with these pictures of Veroli that I recently took.  I hope you enjoy them and have a good week!






 

Fried Scamorza Cheese & Chive Sandwich

Scamorza in Carrozza

Ingredients:
Serves 4

For scamorza in carrozza:

  • 2 eggs
  • 150 ml. milk 
  • salt
  • pepper
  • 8 slices of bread, every slice quartered or leave them whole (cut away the sides)
  • 150 g. Scamorza Affumicata or other kinds of soft smoked cheese, thinly sliced + a small piece that is finely chopped for garnish
  • fresh chives, finely chopped  
  • extra virgin olive oil 
  • flour

For accompaniment (change according to what you have):

  • salad
  • 8 cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • 12 caper berries
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • balsamic vinegar
  • prosciutto crudo
  • salame
Directions:
  1. In a bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, salt & pepper. Set aside.
  2. On a slice of bread,  distribute the soft cheese & chives.  Close with another slice of bread  & press lightly together, like a sandwich.  Repeat until you finish all the bread.
  3. Over medium heat, heat a lightly oiled skillet.
  4. Lightly coat the sandwiches with flour and shake off the excess.
  5. Soak the sandwiches well in the milk mixture.  Place the sandwiches in the skillet and cook both sides until golden.  Do not overcrowd. Serve hot with pre-prepared breakfast platter of salad and ham.  
  6. Salad & ham composition:  tomatoes & salad topped with caper berries and dressed with extra virgin olive oil, salt & balsamic vinegar.  Alternate prosciutto crudo & salame on the side of the plate.


11 comments:

  1. Love your breakfast series! Will have to try this tomorrow. I don't have scamorza, maybe another kind of cheese will do. Thanks! Hannah

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    1. Any kind of soft cheese to your liking would do Hannah. I hope you enjoy your breakfast.

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  2. I am concentrating, truly concentrating on the wonderful photos of Veroli :) ! Uhuh, always have a savoury breakfast: juice and coffee and an open European style sandwich with all kinds of preplanned savoury toppings! The 'cheese-snd-chive' is so very tempting - well, if no one is looking? :) !

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    1. I have more leanings toward savory breakfasts too and I like having juice and coffee with and sometimes hot tea too!

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  3. I always enjoy your photos!

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    1. Thank you for always being so sweet Tessa! I really appreciate it!

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  4. I'll take half a piece and the tomato and caper salad. Never deny oneself anything but all in moderation. Veroli looks lovely. So much history, so much beauty.

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    1. I do believe that too Suzanne. We shouldn't deny ourselves anything but we shouldn't forget to moderate. That's always the key to enjoyment of food. Thanks!

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  5. This process is a little similar to French toast but I have never made something like this. It looks so good and this will be our new sandwich option for lunch time. I jotted down scamorza affumicata and will check if my gourmet store sells this kind of cheese. I love learning about new kind of cheese. You are a supermom... I was thinking about you the other day because you go out take all these pictures and do post process and then you share. That alone is so much work, and you cook, style, and photo shoot for food. Do you have a twin sister? :) I need to learn to be more productive like you!

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    1. It is the Italian version of the savory French toast. The difference between the two is that the Italian one is dipped first in flour while the French one is not. I hope you find scamorza affumicata. If you don't find it, just substitute it with whatever soft cheese you like. Smoked cheese gives a nice flavor. I am not a supermom Nami. LOL! But I do literally run a lot after I cook, fix the plates, props and go after the disappearing natural light. Haha! Now that the days are shorter, I am always after the light outside. My husband & kids cooperate a lot when it's time for me to shoot. :-)

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  6. This sandwich looks wonderful, I love scarmorza and chives! Veroli is beautiful as well.

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